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Roberto Regazzi violin


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#1 TimRobinson

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 04:44 PM

Just looking at this very large photo of a Roberto Regazzi violin. The edges of the back, in particular, seem to show lamination, or is it a scribe mark?

Can anyone enlighten me?

Tim

It is a fabulous piece of work - makes me wonder why on earth I bother trying to make anything.
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#2 gowan

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 04:50 PM

Just looking at this very large photo of a Roberto Regazzi violin. The edges of the back, in particular, seem to show lamination, or is it a scribe mark?

Can anyone enlighten me?

Tim

It is a fabulous piece of work - makes me wonder why on earth I bother trying to make anything.


Don't be discouraged. There were great luthiers whose work was nowhere near so clean and neat, e.g. Guarneri del Gesu and Maggini.

#3 Melvin Goldsmith

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 05:10 PM

[quote name='TimRobinson' timestamp='1332971091' post='538712']
Just looking at this very large photo of a Roberto Regazzi violin. The edges of the back, in particular, seem to show lamination, or is it a scribe mark?

Can anyone enlighten me?

Tim

It is a fabulous piece of work - makes me wonder why on earth I bother trying to make anything.

/quote]

..........

Hi Tim
It's the result of bad layering in photoshop or similar type program. This could well be a pro shot. I had one come in with 8 pegs after everything else had been sorted from a combination of shots and exposures....bring back film and getting it right...re mastered digital shots always look bad.
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#4 David Burgess

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 05:20 PM

It is a fabulous piece of work - makes me wonder why on earth I bother trying to make anything.

Just curious. Why do you feel that it's a fabulous piece of work?

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#5 TimRobinson

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 06:25 PM

Just curious. Why do you feel that it's a fabulous piece of work?


Dear David,

You clearly have never seen anything I made :D

Seriously, I like, and am in awe of, the precision of everything I see in the instrument. To me it demonstrates a mastery of violin making that I will never even get close to. I like the choice of timber, the edgework, the corners and the scroll. I'm partially colour blind so judgement of varnish may not be very good, but to me it looks great.

Regards,

Tim
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#6 A. Dal Mut

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 06:32 PM

Tim,

This is most definitely a scribe line. Scribe lines around the edge can be seen on many classic cremonese instruments, however not in the same fashion
as on this violin. Usually the scribe line is not very visible and was used to mark the boundary for the channel over the purfling. Hope this helps.

Anthony

#7 Melvin Goldsmith

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 07:17 PM

Tim,

This is most definitely a scribe line. Scribe lines around the edge can be seen on many classic cremonese instruments, however not in the same fashion
as on this violin. Usually the scribe line is not very visible and was used to mark the boundary for the channel over the purfling. Hope this helps.

Anthony


Not in this case. It is from Photoshop or similar...
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#8 Michael Richwine

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:08 PM

Not in this case. It is from Photoshop or similar...

If that's the case, how come the color is burned in around the scribe line? I'm not a Photoshop expert, but I downloaded this and took a look on my good monitor, and the line looks like this all the way around, full scale. I don't know any way to produce a look like that accidentally with photo-editing software, but I do know how to do it far too easily with ground stain and torn grain from a scriber.

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#9 TimRobinson

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:35 AM

If that's the case, how come the color is burned in around the scribe line? I'm not a Photoshop expert, but I downloaded this and took a look on my good monitor, and the line looks like this all the way around, full scale. I don't know any way to produce a look like that accidentally with photo-editing software, but I do know how to do it far too easily with ground stain and torn grain from a scriber.


It looked to me like a scribe mark to assist with an even curve on the edges, like the kind I aspire to achieve :) If so, is this a common practice? Why not use pencil?

Tim
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#10 Addie

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:37 AM

Not in this case. It is from Photoshop or similar...


I’m not a luthier, but I made a living for many years using Creative Suite, and this is not a digital artifact... B)

What are those pegs made out of, that has so many pores?

#11 martin swan

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 03:55 AM

I don't think it's a digital artifat - if it was, I'd expect to see it on the button. Also, the change of direction on the corners is sharper than the transition on the edge of the instrument, which suggests the line was scribed or drawn before the corners were finally shaped, and that it's not some kind of "halo" derived from the outline of the photo.
Tim, why not email the maker? I'm sure he'd be delighted to comment ....

#12 fiddlecollector

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:11 AM

This ones the same! Looks like a overly deep scribe use to me,though i dont know about photoshop layering.
If it is a scribe its awfully close to the edge for my liking.In the photo it looks like the edge has been rounded a bit too much to try and get rid of the scribe line.
regazzi

#13 Melvin Goldsmith

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:29 AM

If that's the case, how come the color is burned in around the scribe line? I'm not a Photoshop expert, but I downloaded this and took a look on my good monitor, and the line looks like this all the way around, full scale. I don't know any way to produce a look like that accidentally with photo-editing software, but I do know how to do it far too easily with ground stain and torn grain from a scriber.



Ah....yes I stand corrected. Thanks :) :)
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#14 Michael K.

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 05:59 AM

Just curious. Why do you feel that it's a fabulous piece of work?



Because Violins by Roberto Regazzi show great personality and following of the Bolognese tradition and school.
That is a bid unique this days.

#15 fiddlecollector

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:16 AM

Michael , that may be so, Poggi`s often have distinctive scribe lines remaining but not that close to the edge! :)

#16 Michael K.

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:52 AM

Michael , that may be so, Poggi`s often have distinctive scribe lines remaining but not that close to the edge! :)


Yes you are right. Well i give him a call this afternoon and tell him. Maybe he join us here personal.

#17 David Burgess

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:46 AM

Yes you are right. Well i give him a call this afternoon and tell him. Maybe he join us here personal.

I had hoped there might be an unfettered discussion of the style from the viewpoint of various observers, since it's different from Cremonese. I guess that'll be the end of that. ;)

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#18 Will L

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:05 AM

It looked to me like a scribe mark to assist with an even curve on the edges, like the kind I aspire to achieve :) If so, is this a common practice? Why not use pencil?

Tim


It is a common practice. What's odd here is that since the scribe line usually describes where the crest will be; here it is outside of that (near the button at least the crest seems well inside, not so much around the upper-left corner of the top) and should have disappeared in rolling the edge. Maybe he scribed too deeply, or didn't roll the edge very quickly? Some people do use pencil, but it gets lost sometimes in the working.

#19 Michael_Molnar

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:26 AM

My very quick observations are that the button does not have the chamfer I expect. The c-bouts seem to be "shallow" by which I mean they make a tighter curve than what I would do.

As for the line around the edge, I have done this once by running my finger around the edge to remove varnish. Maybe that is what we are seeing. I agree that it is not an artifact of any digital image app.

Stay Tuned.
Mike

PS: Overall it is quite nice.

Stay tuned.


#20 jacobsaunders

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:04 AM

I had hoped there might be an unfettered discussion of the style from the viewpoint of various observers, since it's different from Cremonese. I guess that'll be the end of that. ;)


I’m really grateful to Regazzi for (translating and) publishing, back in 1986, the “Manuscript on Violin Making, by G. A. Marchi, Bologna 1786”, a fascinating book which I have read and reread many times. The kind of dedication neaded to do that, I think, underlines his claim to be in the line of an old Bolognese tradition.

Since nobody else wanted to pick up David’s gauntlet, I’m not to sure that I like how the outline of the top bouts, harmonise with the outline of the bottom ones, but perhaps one shouldn’t criticise.




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