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Spider Silk Strings!


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#1 Michael_Molnar

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:20 PM

From BBC

A Japanese researcher has used thousands of strands of spider silk to spin a set of violin strings.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-17232058

:blink:

Stay tuned.


#2 Bill Yacey

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:57 PM

That's very interesting; my experience with spider webbing is that it's very elastic. I wonder how much those strings actually stretched before they settled into equilibrium at pitch.

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#3 Mat Roop

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 11:05 PM

From BBC

A Japanese researcher has used thousands of strands of spider silk to spin a set of violin strings.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-17232058

:blink:

Great idea... but the second para reads "The strings are said to have a "soft and profound timbre" relative to traditional gut or steel strings." Not sure I agree that the soft and profound is applicable to steel srings...more research coming no doubt. ...cheers, Mat
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#4 Darren Molnar

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 09:56 AM

The first bit of this doc. shows some goat hybrids invented to produce spider silk in their milk. Mind blowing stuff for when, or if, we need a larger supply of spidey strings.


http://topdocumentar...om/playing-god/
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#5 propolis

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 02:58 PM

It would be astonishing to find that silk from the mulberry-eating silkmoth (Bombyx mori) has never been tried for violin strings. After all, Chinese spike fiddles such as the erhu have historically used silk strings...

#6 Anders Buen

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:07 PM

The violin sounds like an Erhu with these strings, and there seems to be some problem getting the lower string to build up a natural Helmholz motion producing a normal note. Music for the spiderman. :lol:
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#7 robertdo

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:17 PM

they won't come cheap on the market when they arrive... :)

#8 ZachB

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 10:59 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-17243105

Link to the audio.

#9 fiddlecollector

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 04:58 AM

Im almost sure silk strings used to be advertised for violins decades ago (early 20th century)

#10 robertdo

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:11 AM

Im almost sure silk strings used to be advertised for violins decades ago (early 20th century)

I don't know but they were probably silkworm silk strings since it was already a huge market and people had no trouble making thread with it. But spider silk seem to possess better properties to make violin strings (more resistant at a given diameter and more elastic). I have just read a small article where researchers engineered silkworms to produce silk with some of the spider web proteins. I believe this would be a better approach than transgenic sheep since the bombyx naturally produce the worm/spider thread while one has to purify the spider silk protein from the sheep milk and polymerise it etc,,... and it's quite time consuming. Let's see... :)

#11 La Folia

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 12:09 PM

The violin sounds like an Erhu with these strings

Maybe, but look at this. http://www.mnn.com/l...ays-beautifully Is this a fractional sized violin?

#12 robertdo

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 12:50 PM

Maybe, but look at this. http://www.mnn.com/l...ays-beautifully Is this a fractional sized violin?

It's definitely a fraction size violin (1/4 or 1/2), but whether it's the one played or not is unclear. Maybe for their trial they couldn't get strings long enough for a full size. I can't really comment on the strings but the sound seems to lack power. If it's really a fraction size, then it could be expected though.

Edit. Unless the man is the tallest man in the world... :)

#13 JSully

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 02:50 PM

The clip reminds me of very old recordings.




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