• Announcements

    • ghunt

      Forum Update *UPDATED*   12/30/16

      If you are a Maestronet member, you will likely have noticed a major upgrade to our forum software. This new software improves on a number of areas - one of the biggest is mobile support. This new format is responsive, and so will work nicely on browsers of all sizes. Other improvements will be forthcoming shortly, including SSL for the entire site. A few notes that will help you with the new setup: Your username for logging in is now either your screen name, or your email address - either will work. Your old username will no longer work. When typing a message, the system will periodically auto-save your content as you type. If you lose connection, or return at another time, simply to back to the conversation or thread, hit the Reply button, and your saved content will be there ready for editing. There is a link at the top right of every page labelled "Unread Content" which will show you in a nice timeline view new content. The site can send notifications to your browser, but this can be turned off. Have a look around and check out some of the new features. If you notice anything off, post in News, or PM Jeff or Glenn and we will look into it. Happy New Year from the Maestronet Team.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Michael_Molnar

Spider Silk Strings!

13 posts in this topic

That's very interesting; my experience with spider webbing is that it's very elastic. I wonder how much those strings actually stretched before they settled into equilibrium at pitch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From BBC

A Japanese researcher has used thousands of strands of spider silk to spin a set of violin strings.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-17232058

:blink:

Great idea... but the second para reads "The strings are said to have a "soft and profound timbre" relative to traditional gut or steel strings." Not sure I agree that the soft and profound is applicable to steel srings...more research coming no doubt. ...cheers, Mat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be astonishing to find that silk from the mulberry-eating silkmoth (Bombyx mori) has never been tried for violin strings. After all, Chinese spike fiddles such as the erhu have historically used silk strings...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The violin sounds like an Erhu with these strings, and there seems to be some problem getting the lower string to build up a natural Helmholz motion producing a normal note. Music for the spiderman. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they won't come cheap on the market when they arrive... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im almost sure silk strings used to be advertised for violins decades ago (early 20th century)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im almost sure silk strings used to be advertised for violins decades ago (early 20th century)

I don't know but they were probably silkworm silk strings since it was already a huge market and people had no trouble making thread with it. But spider silk seem to possess better properties to make violin strings (more resistant at a given diameter and more elastic). I have just read a small article where researchers engineered silkworms to produce silk with some of the spider web proteins. I believe this would be a better approach than transgenic sheep since the bombyx naturally produce the worm/spider thread while one has to purify the spider silk protein from the sheep milk and polymerise it etc,,... and it's quite time consuming. Let's see... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's definitely a fraction size violin (1/4 or 1/2), but whether it's the one played or not is unclear. Maybe for their trial they couldn't get strings long enough for a full size. I can't really comment on the strings but the sound seems to lack power. If it's really a fraction size, then it could be expected though.

Edit. Unless the man is the tallest man in the world... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.