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Toothed plane blade


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#1 James Ansara

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 12:16 PM

At the risk of ruining a blade for my Stanley block plane. Iam considering filing grooves in the leading edge (of blade) to make it "toothed".I imagine I will also wreck a triangle file as well.While looking at M.Darnton's website it appeared to me that this is what he did to plane ribstock.Any suggestions or cautions would be welcomed.Thanks,James.

#2 Craig Tucker

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 12:56 PM

At the risk of ruining a blade for my Stanley block plane. Iam considering filing grooves in the leading edge (of blade) to make it "toothed".I imagine I will also wreck a triangle file as well.While looking at M.Darnton's website it appeared to me that this is what he did to plane ribstock.Any suggestions or cautions would be welcomed.Thanks,James.



I seem to remember something about a Dremel and a cutting wheel, but it's been a while and I may be wrong about that.

In any case if you go that route, don't even think about doing anything without adequate eye protection.

And if the band you're in starts playing different tunes...

I'll see you on the dark side of the moon.


#3 Brad Dorsey

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 01:18 PM

I seem to remember something about a Dremel and a cutting wheel...


Yes, Michael said that he cut teeth in his plane blades with a cutting wheel mounted in a Dremel.

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#4 robertdo

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 02:00 PM

I did that with one of my plane using a dremel and Diamond wheel. they will cut like butter the steel of your blade. I couldn't even dent it with a normal saw.
But I also bought some toothed blades for the thumb planes I have and they are definitely much better and not that expensive. It much easier to thin the ribs with them.

#5 JohnCockburn

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 04:56 PM

At the risk of ruining a blade for my Stanley block plane. Iam considering filing grooves in the leading edge (of blade) to make it "toothed".I imagine I will also wreck a triangle file as well.While looking at M.Darnton's website it appeared to me that this is what he did to plane ribstock.Any suggestions or cautions would be welcomed.Thanks,James.


you can buy toothed blades for most stanley block planes from Ray Iles: http://www.oldtools.free-online.co.uk/

#6 MikeC

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 05:49 PM

I doubt you would be able to cut a plane blade with a triangle file. It would probably just skate off without even making much of a scratch.

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#7 NewNewbie

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 07:27 PM

I seem to remember something about a Dremel and a cutting wheel, but it's been a while and I may be wrong about that.

Great memory!
Was it this??????

#8 James Ansara

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 07:52 PM

Thanks muchly guys,your help is appreciated! James.

#9 matrix12x

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 08:39 PM

I have used a triangle file to make a few toothed blades. The notch was a little on the slow side to start, but cut quickly. I also used "cutting fluid" on the file. The file looks ok afterwards.
Then I resharpened the plane's blade. The Dremel sounds like a great idea though.

I find the toothed blades made planing the maple ribs super easy.

#10 JohnCockburn

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 04:24 AM

it's quite a good exercise in "planemanship" to learn how to set up your plane well enough that you don't need a toothed blade for rib stock!

#11 Janito

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 09:50 AM

it's quite a good exercise in "planemanship" to learn how to set up your plane well enough that you don't need a toothed blade for rib stock!


Sometimes it's easier to do what some of the Masters did - fit for purpose idea.

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#12 Bill Yacey

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 10:29 AM

However you create the teeth, you'll want to do it slowly without creating much heat, otherwise you'll lose the temper in the blade.

"It is the mark of an instructed mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits, and not to seek exactness when only an approximation of the truth is possible." - Aristotle

 


#13 James Ansara

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 12:20 PM

Thanks again everyone.I feel my "planemanship" is good,having many years exp. as a cabinet maker (I've only made three violins and four guitars).When I got toothed blades for my finger planes they allowed me more freedom in maple.I like having the option of toothed and straight blades though and I will try the drill press Dremel cut-off wheel set-up in the link Newbie posted.Of course in the shop:"saftey first,and second."Has anyone experienced a dust collector fire when someone used the belt sander to sharpen a scraper? Take care, James.

#14 captainhook

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 04:30 PM

If you do use the drill press method, which, while tedious, should work fine, PLEASE feed the blade from the other direction so that it doesn't become a lethal projectile.

I made a jig for a Dremel using a flexible shaft that is very easy to use and adjust, but I've only used it on small planes. Most of the time I have not found the toothed blades to be much advantage, but they do help on some pieces of maple.

What I think would be more useful is something I saw on the Woodwright's Shop. A couple of guys doing old fashioned hand veneering used a toothed SCRAPER plane with nice results. I have stooped to using one of my small toothed blades as a scraper on impossible grain. It was the only thing that worked short of sandpaper. I may try making a finger-size scraper plane.

#15 Stephen Shepherd

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 05:28 PM

Posted ImageI have made several toothed blades from replacement block plane blade. Done entirely with a triangular file.
I have the Honor to Remain,
Moft Refpectfully,


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#16 Craig Tucker

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Posted 05 September 2011 - 02:40 PM

Great memory!
Was it this??????



No, but thanks Newb, great link.
After I posted about what I remembered, I got caught up (as usual) mentally designing a jig to cut such a blade...
What he shows here looks like it would work well - not that I would ever make one, if a toothed plane blade wasn't available I think I'd just do without (I'm just too d@mned lazy...)

Luckily, I have commercial toothed plane blades for all of my thumb planes.

And if the band you're in starts playing different tunes...

I'll see you on the dark side of the moon.


#17 Galen

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 12:20 PM

I've made toothed irons for each of my block and smoother planes using a Dremel tool and "cut-off" discs... Pick up basic replacement or used irons and give them a sharpening (square the edge, flatten the bottom side, and apply the basic sharpening angle)... Use your MM rule and a fine-point Sharpie pen to "lay out" the teeth on the edge of the iron... Place the iron in a vise on the flat, and carefully cut the teeth, then "scary" sharpen and hone...

#18 kubasa

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 06:02 PM

I ended up buying one from here:

My link

Had to buy a slightly longer adjustment screw to hold the blade in place but other than that it works great (and safer than me making one....)

James

#19 violins88

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 07:02 PM

At the risk of ruining a blade for my Stanley block plane. Iam considering filing grooves in the leading edge (of blade) to make it "toothed".I imagine I will also wreck a triangle file as well.While looking at M.Darnton's website it appeared to me that this is what he did to plane ribstock.Any suggestions or cautions would be welcomed.Thanks,James.

An alternative, based on what a well known maker does, is to make the blade super sharp. If you have a blade holder to keep the angle, start with 15 micron silicon carbide mylar backed on glass, then 5 micron at a one degree larger angle, then 3 micron.

John




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