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Modern Bowmakers


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#21 martin swan

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 09:23 AM

The bow I use at the moment is an outstanding modern bow made by French maker Gilles Chancereul.

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#22 allezlesbleus

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 09:55 AM

Roy Quade and Donald Cohen make very nice sticks. Not sure if I'm qualified to say they are the "best" but I was quite impressed with both.

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#23 Melvin Goldsmith

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 10:27 AM

I can't comment on many of the makers mentioned because I have not tried their wares. I am a fan of Noel Burke's bows. Also recently a client showed me Gary Leahy violin bow which was very fine in all aspects.
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#24 Pebbles

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 10:55 AM

Steven DeCoux - I have a violin and a cello bow of his, they are great.
Also have some bows by Vito Vissicaro, I use those mainly in orchestra work.
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#25 JohnCockburn

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 11:46 AM

Bottom line: so many names will be mentioned that the thread becomes meaningless.
And we can't have an interesting critical discussion along the lines of: "you must be joking, I wouldn't trust him to make a walking stick", because we are talking about real people with livings to earn.
Bit of a waste of time really.

#26 David Burgess

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 12:07 PM

Probably true. And for some of us in the trade, a lot of them are friends, so it's pretty awkward to give them a public ranking.

If I had a question like that, I would start asking professional bow makers about whose work they admire, privately, and expect that a few names will come up again and again. That's kind of how it works with fiddles.

Before you criticize a man you should walk a mile in his shoes.

That way when you criticize him you will be a mile away and you will have his
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#27 C.B.Fiddler

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 12:24 PM

It is my intent to showcase modern bow makers in this thread - not to rank or criticize them. Actually, I am finding the contributions rather useful because I now have a number of familiar and unfamiliar makers to research and possibly recognize when purchase time comes.

The next time someone searches this forum for modern bowmakers they will find an impressive list of names. Why would this be deemed a meaningless waste of time?
If nothing else, I didn't cut the button off...

#28 JohnCockburn

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 12:42 PM

Sorry CBF, nothing personal. Just musing. Ignore me. Bad day at the office.

#29 C.B.Fiddler

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 12:47 PM

No worries. I'm having a bad week at the office so I turn my attention to bows... ;)
If nothing else, I didn't cut the button off...

#30 Dave Slight

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 01:26 PM

When I'm having a bad day at the workshop, my attention turns to cakes sadly.....
Bow wise Gary Leahy is an excellent up and coming maker.
Dave.

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#31 David Burgess

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 02:34 PM

Didn't know what you were up to, CB. Usually, this kind of question comes up when someone is in the market. What happens then is that people post their favorites, which is often what they happen to own (no surprise there), and you end up with a mish-mash of names encompassing a broad mix of quality.

Before you criticize a man you should walk a mile in his shoes.

That way when you criticize him you will be a mile away and you will have his
shoes.

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The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up.


#32 C.B.Fiddler

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 03:38 PM

You're partially correct, David. I am about to consign something and will be in the market for a couple of modern bows when/if it sells. I figured researching these names taking note of where they may be found and playing a few sticks may help me pass the time. I was also surprised that not much resulted from a MN search of "Modern Bowmkers." I was hoping to remedy that...

Thanks!
CB
If nothing else, I didn't cut the button off...

#33 Ed Shillitoe

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 03:43 PM

That's become quite a long list now.

But why are there so few here on Maestronet? By my count there are 2! And on the bow section of 'another forum' there have been exactly 3 posts all year. And why are there basically no amateur bow makers?

Ed

#34 Janito

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 04:58 PM

And why are there basically no amateur bow makers?


1. Because the subject is so poorly described in publications. The few tomes there are use jigs etc and provide little sense on how to achieve good dimensions and camber so that the bow straightens evenly when hair is tightened.

2. Because the frog-work needs good milling equipment that is often not available

ps - I am an amateur with many unfinished sticks - work stopped when the teacher and I became separated by 3000 miles.

Amateur

But never amateurish.


#35 David Burgess

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 05:21 PM

But why are there so few here on Maestronet? By my count there are 2! And on the bow section of 'another forum' there have been exactly 3 posts all year.

They're non-social. Well actually, they're very social, but not in a way most people can relate to. They are even more odd than violin makers, if such a thing is possible. :lol:

Before you criticize a man you should walk a mile in his shoes.

That way when you criticize him you will be a mile away and you will have his
shoes.

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The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up.


#36 Addie

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 05:33 PM

This sort of came up in the "what is art?" digression of the Lady Blunt detail photos...

A lot of what is discussed on the Pegbox is aesthetics. But people don't really spend much time on MoP and abalone, or with how a bowmaker handled his taper. Posted Image

But choosing a new bow really is a fun experience. I would love to hear WHY people chose the bows they have. I think MANFIO posted some sound terms that would help?



"Stunning abalone!" Posted Image

#37 David Burgess

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 06:01 PM

CB, if you want to stay within the US, and don't mind a trip, there's a pretty good concentration around Port Townsend and the Washington State Olympic Peninsula. Two major reasons for this concentration are Paul Siefried, and Charles Espey. Morgan Anderson moved out of the area a while back, but I consider him and Peg to be part of that bunch. Morgan had some other interesting influences, like a purported genius machinist who worked for Frank Passa, Reid Kowalis (the spelling may be off, I didn't look it up), who managed to come to a high level of bow making in almost no time.

If you are willing to go outside the US, a major teacher and influence in bowmaking has been Stephane Tomachot. Espey spent some time with him.

Before you criticize a man you should walk a mile in his shoes.

That way when you criticize him you will be a mile away and you will have his
shoes.

Burgess Instruments
Oberlin Restoration Workshops

The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to catch up.


#38 C.B.Fiddler

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 07:10 PM

Oddly enough, tomorrow is my birthday; this info is a wonderful gift. Thank you.

My intention is to have a few bows each sent to my home from some of the makers listed in this thread for my wife & I to try. I won't waste their time until the funds are clear. Thank you again for the insight!

CB
If nothing else, I didn't cut the button off...

#39 Brad Dorsey

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 08:04 PM

...why are there basically no amateur bow makers?...


1. It is very hard to get pernambuco.

2. Graduating the stick is very subtle and very complicated.

Time flies like an arrow.  Fruit flies like a banana.


#40 Brad Dorsey

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 08:07 PM

...the frog-work needs good milling equipment...


Not true. Fine frogs can be made entirely with hand tools. I think a lathe is more of a necessity for button making than a milling machine is for frog making.

Time flies like an arrow.  Fruit flies like a banana.





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