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In-Cannel or Out-Cannel Gouges


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#1 emviolins

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 01:13 PM

I've had my eye on a particular antique gouge for some time now and yesterday after researching the company...I decided to buy it. My hesitation to buy this gouge was because it is an In-Cannel and most of the gouges I've seen posted were Out-Cannel type. Are In-Cannel gouges mostly made for wood turning? Can an In-Cannel gouge be used to carve tops and backs? What are the pro's and cons when using and/or sharpening.
The gouge was made by the L. & I.J. White company of Buffalo, NY.

http://toolemera.com....i.j.white.html

-Ernie

#2 Dave Slight

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 03:23 PM

In Cannel gouges are used for making straight cuts.
In violin making they are most useful for shaping corner blocks, where you want a flat surface cut to a radius. A large one can be used for some rough arching, but they are not as versatile as the Out Cannel type for this work.
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#3 propolis

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 03:23 PM

In-cannel for shaping corner blocks and trimming them after the garland comes off the mold, regular gouges for everything else?

I only own one factory-made in-cannel gouge. I did make a little one once, for grooving the undersides of bow plugs, but it now sits unused, casting sorrowful glances at the little store-bought palm gouge.

#4 captainhook

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 05:44 PM

In-cannels are not generally used for turning. I have recently learned to appreciate them for scroll work and a few other things. The ones I use most, both in-cannel and out-cannel, are home made and I have sets of both. In-cannels are a little trickier to sharpen but not too bad. Can you get along without in-cannels? Of course.

#5 emviolins

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 07:11 PM

Here are some pictures...I dropped it off yesterday to my saw sharpening guy and he put an edge on it but I would like to see if I can remove all the gouge marks that are still left...it is much better than before...Has anyone ever reground to make an in-cannel into a out-cannel? That's alot of grinding and I would be worried about destroying the temper...so I guess that isn't a good idea. I would like to use this gouge for rough arching...either way I think it's a beautiful piece of american manufacturing history...

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#6 Mark Sullivan

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 07:19 PM

HHas anyone ever reground to make an in-cannel into a out-cannel? That's alot of grinding and I would be worried about destroying the temper...so I guess that isn't a good idea.


I have, I just retempered it.

#7 iburkard

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 07:53 PM

Sharpening guy? :) He also sold me a leather apron. But that's another story.

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It's easy to change a gouge. If you can sacrifice a sanding drum. Simply clamp a hand drill into a vice (with padding), and then glide the blade over the spinning drum. It's not the safest operation, but works and gives a nice clean look. It is also possible to get different diameter sanding drums for different size gouges.

#8 Torbjörn Zethelius

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:58 AM

The incannel gouge seems nice for shaping corner blocks etc. I use a small incannel gouge to hollow the pegbox. It is very efficient.

#9 captainhook

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 07:29 PM

One other point: If you hone a significant microbevel on the outside of an in-cannel, it takes on some of the character of an out-cannel without a lot of work. Try that before you do a major regrind. An advantage is that you can make a "long" microbevel easily that can give you better leverage without weakening the edge.

#10 emviolins

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:17 PM

One other point: If you hone a significant microbevel on the outside of an in-cannel, it takes on some of the character of an out-cannel without a lot of work. Try that before you do a major regrind. An advantage is that you can make a "long" microbevel easily that can give you better leverage without weakening the edge.


Makes sense...Thanks for the suggestion...




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