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Emile Dupree Bow


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#1 Alison

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Posted 17 September 1997 - 10:12 PM

I have a bow with the name Emile Dupree and "France" stamped into it. It is in very good condition, with only the slightest warp/bend to the right in the middle of the stick... It's almost unnoticable.

I love the bow. It seems to be perfectly balanced and behaves just like an extension of your hand.

Does anyone have any information on what this bow may be worth and/or how old it might be? Between what years did Dupree make bows?

My teacher said it was "worth no less than $500." Does that sound right? Too high? Too low?

Thanks!




#2 Mark Dzialo

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Posted 18 September 1997 - 01:44 PM

: I have a bow with the name Emile Dupree and "France" stamped into it. It is in very good condition, with only the slightest warp/bend to the right in the middle of the stick... It's almost unnoticable.

: I love the bow. It seems to be perfectly balanced and behaves just like an extension of your hand.

: Does anyone have any information on what this bow may be worth and/or how old it might be? Between what years did Dupree make bows?

: My teacher said it was "worth no less than $500." Does that sound right? Too high? Too low?

: Thanks!

At the May 1995 Skinner Auction in Boston an Emile
Dupree Bow was sold for $1,495. A dealer might sell
it for double or triple that amount. You can, however,
purchase a superior new bow from a Gold Medal winner
like David Forbes for $2,500. It's always best to shop.
I can't speak for your teacher, but $500 doesn't buy
much of a bow today.





#3 Alison

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Posted 18 September 1997 - 03:40 PM

: At the May 1995 Skinner Auction in Boston an Emile
: Dupree Bow was sold for $1,495. A dealer might sell
: it for double or triple that amount. You can, however,
: purchase a superior new bow from a Gold Medal winner
: like David Forbes for $2,500. It's always best to shop.
: I can't speak for your teacher, but $500 doesn't buy
: much of a bow today.

Thanks for the info. I already own the bow, and am
just curious to know more about it. (Not looking
to buy or sell.) It was purchased along with a
nice violin at a pawn shop for $230 (the shop
apparently had no idea of the actual value).

My teacher really likes both the violin and the
bow, and says the whole outfit should be worth no
less than $1500, so I'm ahead by at least $1300
anyway. :)

Anyone else have more info to contribute? I can't
seem to find much on the 'net about Dupree bows.
We did see a book in the library which was
published in the 1970's... There were a couple
of Dupree bows in there, listed as being worth
$500-750 at that time.




#4 Kim Swayne

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Posted 19 September 1997 - 09:59 PM

I bought a brand new bow just last year also stamped Emile Duprée, France. I paid $350 (canadian $). I think there are different qualities of bows bearing that name. The one I purchased is OK but it's not worth any more than that. (It's kind of soft).

Maybe someone who is in the business could fill us in. I think that often a well-known bow-maker lends his name to an "atelier" or "workshop" which then churns out student quality bows using the famous name. That's what I have. (The dealer had a whole box full of "Emile Dupree" bows.)

Anyways, there's only one important thing - that you have a bow you like!

I just found out that my "main" bow is of much lesser value than I thought. It uses a fairly well known name (O. Hermann) as well, but was not hand-made by the actual maker. Anyways it's a great bow but I think the dealer charged me way too much!!! ($1,750)

Someone told me that usually if its stamped "Germany" or "France", these are usually lesser valued work-shop models rather than original completely hand-made.

Could a luthier out there please fill us in?




#5 Jeffrey Holmes - Old Posts

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Posted 21 September 1997 - 07:31 PM

In response to the question concerning bows stamped with the country of origin:

As I understand it, this practice is due to import/export requirements instituted after WW1. The bows were made with export in mind, but not all the bows bearing the brand of the country of origin are exactly "cheap" these days. I have seen "Germany" stamped on the underside of numerous bow sticks from the Nurnberger and Pfretzschner workshops. The "France" version often appears on commercial sticks (like the ones stamped "Emile Dupree"), some Bazin workshop bows. I have also seen Hill bows (made for export) which bear the brand "W. E. Hill & Sons England".

Best wishes and happy bow shopping.

Jeffrey




#6 Al Stancel

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Posted 22 September 1997 - 05:41 PM

: I have a bow with the name Emile Dupree and "France" stamped into it. It is in very good condition, with only the slightest warp/bend to the right in the middle of the stick... It's almost unnoticable.

: I love the bow. It seems to be perfectly balanced and behaves just like an extension of your hand.

: Does anyone have any information on what this bow may be worth and/or how old it might be? Between what years did Dupree make bows?

: My teacher said it was "worth no less than $500." Does that sound right? Too high? Too low?

: Thanks!

Hi: Must add my 3 cents worth...Emile Dupree
was the "trade name" of good bows wholesaled
by Metropolitian Music Co., when they were in
New York City. The time was circa 1935. They
sold the bows for from $25 to $35 each. The
bows were made by various makers in Mirecourt,
France. Later, Metropolitian imported bows from
Germany...not as good as the ones from France.
In 1978 the better Emile Dupree bow was valued
about $750. Today, they are as you've been told
around $1500 or so. Quality level does vary, and
the actual value depends on how good it plays.
This is because the actual maker is probably un-
known. Jeffrey is right about country of origin..

Regards,

Al Stancel www.violincasa.com








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