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Preach

Round-edged violins

12 posts in this topic

I need your help in answering a question.

I saw a violin for sell the other day made with what I would call round-edges. This thing had no lip on the top or bottom, but rounded edges. It is like nothing I have ever seen.

Where would this style come from? Would this style be any good as far as violins are concerned?

Mike

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I understand Stradivari made at least one guitar-shaped violin. I don't know if that one had rounded edges. The corners of the C-bouts on a conventional violin certainly do assist in the anchoring of the arched top.

Here's a quote from Beament's book 'The Violin Explained.' I believe his source is Lothar Cremer's authoritative work on the physics of violins:

"Altogether one has to conclude that there is no evidence that any particular or specific shape or detail of the box has any special acoustical significance other than the arching of the front."

I don't know if it's as simple as that, but it makes for interesting debates.

Mark_W

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Could be Rigart Rubus - Russian maker - mid to late 19th century.

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Edges and corners are two different things. From Preach's description, I'm picturing an EDGEless instrument. I imagine that a violin with little or no wood beyond the purfling would be difficult to work on if it ever needed its top removed.

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Marie is right, there are no edges anywhere on this instrument. The edges/corners on this instrument are cut down a 1/16 or 1/32 of an inch and then are glued straight into the ribs. This leaves rounded edges on the whole of the body of the violin. It does look like it would be very hard if not impossible to get the top off without destroying the seam between the two.

Preach

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Definitely sounds like a Rigart Rubus to me - he was known for his "edgeless" violins. I don't think his instruments are very popular, though (the ones I have seen for sale have been very cheap) - perhaps this is because they are impossible to repair!

natnot

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Does anyone know anything about Rigart Rubus and what his violins are like as far as sound?

Also, is this something that caught on in Russia and are others making this style of violin? It will be cheap and it does not have a label, but it is in great shape.

Preach

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I think that violins like this are not popular because violinists are by nature quite conservative especially orchestral players who do not want to stand out. I bought a guitar shaped violin for £120 because nobody else wanted it. It is a great violin - you don't need those blocks, believe me it is very sturdy without them.

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I've never played one, so I don't know what they sound like. but perhaps they do sound quite good and are only cheap because they re non-traditional in design, as Soundboot said. I've never heard of any other maker doing this style of violin, so I would assume that it didn't really catch on. Another one:

http://www.springersmusic.co.uk/images/ins...nodd/Vod016.htm

natnot

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I have a Rigat Rubus that I bought because I have a good friend who is a Russian language teacher and is interested in strings. The label says 'St. Petersburg' rather than Leningrad, which I thought was cool.

It came with the top already removed, a bonus I guess. Anyway, the bass bar is integral, very short, and the workmanship inside is very poor. I haven't bothered to do anything with it, as I see it as a wallhanger only.

Jack

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hmm..I have one as well, not necesarily a Rubus but a rounded russian thing. The workman ship insde mine is very neat! I have never had it set up so I cannot speak of its sound though. My scroll is differnet as well, looks like soft ice cream at McDonalds.

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